Business Interview – Clear Sky Communications with John Groot

Today we’d like to introduce a new interview series to introduce our Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan business members to the general community.

If you’d like to interview with us for our business interview series, please email us at info@cancham.tw with the subject line “CCCT Business Interview”.

To kick off this series, we have an interview for you with Mr. John Groot, owner of Clear Sky Communications based in Taipei.

CCCT: Thanks for joining us today, John. Can you tell us a little about yourself?John Groot

I used to be a journalist back in Canada. I’ve been working here in Taiwan as a trainer for 14 years. Last year I finished a project where I walked around the entire coastline of Taiwan.

CCCT: Can you tell us a little about your business?

We’re a small training and consulting company, a bit of a boutique business. We do customized programs that include business English training for teams with a specific purpose, like marketing teams, IT teams, sales teams etc., as well as some more interesting programs like cross-cultural communication. We also do writing and editing work, like technical editing, online articles, and also some curriculum design.

CCCT: How did you get started with Clear Sky Communications?

Well, I had been working as a freelancer for a while, and had a chance to do a big project for a major ICT brand. But I needed to issue them an official tax receipt, so we incorporated. After that, things just snowballed.

CCCT: Can you describe your customers?

They’re a pretty diverse group. I’ve worked for many of the biggest ICT brands, some less well known Taiwanese tech firms, big pharma companies, and lots of individuals. I’ve had some private clients who were newly arrived business people who wanted to get a cultural orientation to Taiwan. I’ve done training for the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei’s trade assistants. I guess the common thread is that they all have an international focus.

CCCT: Would you mind answering how you set your business up here in Taiwan?

I set up the business with my wife, as it was the easiest way to do it.

CCCT: Where do you see your business in the next year? In the next five years? In the next ten years?

Over the next 2-4 years we hope to become one of the top customized training companies in Taiwan. Our plan is NOT to hire more employees, expand, and compete for market share with established players, but rather to follow the small team approach and go for higher-level training opportunities.

CCCT: Is there anything about your company that you feel makes it special? Clear Sky Communications Taipei

We really take the time to get to know what senior managers want, what HR wants, and what the trainees want. Then when we deliver the program, it is almost always very close to what everyone actually needs. If it isn’t, we can correct course very quickly. This is actually rarer in the training business than you might think.

We can do all this because the trainer, the training program designer, and the contact window are one person, myself. So I can get to know everyone and don’t operate at a distance from decision makers or end users. I think this helps us deliver a special level of customized service.

CCCT: Thanks, John. We look forward to seeing you out at a CCCT event some day soon! Good luck!

Business Links

http://www.clearskycommunications.tw/

https://www.facebook.com/clearskycommunications

If you’d like to interview with us for our business interview series, please email us at info@cancham.tw with the subject line “CCCT Business Interview”.

Chairman’s New Year Message

Dear Members and Friends,

On behalf of the Canadian Chamber’s Board of Directors and Supervisors, I would to thank you for your continued support and patronage to the Canadian Chamber. This year has been another successful year for the Chamber, both in terms of activity and membership.

Our signature event, Celebration Canada, drew 9,000 people this year, benefiting from being able to hold the event in the same location the past three years: the Hakka Cultural Park. We hope to hold the 2016 party at the Hakka Cultural Park again and I look forward to seeing you there!

This year also marks two new key initiatives for our Chamber: the establishment of the Small Business Committee and its Small Business Network; and our first ever MacKay Gala Charity Ball.

The Small Business Network is a new initiative where the Chamber is reaching out to support and bring together small businesses owners (or those interested in starting small business in Taiwan) and provide them with a forum to share ideas, network with each other, and learn from expert speakers. Our monthly Small Business Network meetings have been well attended and we are planning on introducing a new Small Business Membership category into our Chamber membership structure to recognize the special status of small businesses.

The first MacKay Gala Charity Ball was held this year and we are already busy planning the second one for 2016. The event is a tribute to a great Canadian, whose legacy is well known and respected in Taiwan.

By working with MacKay Hospital, and through the generous participation of sponsors, we were able to raise money for the hospital. We hope that this event will become an annual event and take its place among the other well-established balls and galas of Taiwan.

On a personal note, I would also like to thank our members and the Board of Directors for letting me serve again as acting Chairman, following Allan Read’s return to Canada this past summer. It is always an honour and a privilege for me to be associated with the Chamber and the good work it does! I will not be running for Chairman at our Annual General Meeting in January, but I certainly plan to remain involved!

The Chamber’s Board of Directors and committee members are always looking for new people to get involved and I encourage anyone who is interested and has time, to join us in this very worthwhile cause.

Finally, I wish you all a happy, healthy, and prosperous New Year!

Leo Seewald
Acting Chairman, Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan

Event Recap: CCCT’s 1st Annual MacKay Charity Gala

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan (CCCT), in partnership with MacKay Memorial Hospital and in cooperation with the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei | 加拿大駐台北貿易辦事處 (CTOT), hosted our first Annual MacKay Charity Gala to benefit the MacKay Children’s Hospital.

MacKay Charity Gala 2015

The MacKay Charity Gala also honours 145 years of healthcare and welfare partnership between Canada and Taiwan. With the success of this year’s MacKay Charity Gala event, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan (CCCT) has provided additional funding to the MacKay Children’s Hospital. Your generosity has provided Taiwanese children in need with high-quality medical support and care.

We are very pleased to announce that we raised more than $10,000CDN for the Children’s Ward at MacKay Memorial Hospital.

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce would like to express our gratitude to you for your support of our first MacKay Charity Gala. It is only because of your support that we were able to host such a successful event and make such a significant donation to the Children’s Wing of the Mackay Memorial Hospital.

The Seewalds

We would like to extend our sincere thanks to MacKay Memorial Hospital and to Dr Yang, as well as

Our Gold Sponsor

FemtoPath HongJing 弘晉有限公司

Our Silver Sponsors

Asclepiumm 艾斯克立必恩
Fortune Medical 富強醫材
HAN
AP Bio 亞力生醫

Thank you to our Silent Auction providers:

Special thanks to:

  • Dr. Kuo for the use of his artwork
  • JDT International
  • National Taiwan College of Performing Arts 臺灣戲曲學院
  • MacKay Gentlemen’s Quartet
  • and to the CCCT MacKay Charity Gala Committee and Vanessa van Dyck for their hard work and dedication to making this event a success!

Facebook – CCCT’s Mackay Charity Gala Gallery on Facebook for more photos.

Photos by Antonin Lee Photography

2015 Remembrance Event in Taiwan

From August 1942 until September 1945, more than 4350 Allied prisoners of war were held in 14 POW camps on the island of Taiwan. They suffered terribly at the hands of their Japanese captors and more than 10% of the POWs died. In 1997, the Kinkaseki / Taiwan Prisoner of War Memorial at Jinguashi was built and dedicated, and every year since then a Remembrance Day service has been held on the site of the old POW camp.

The Taiwan POW Camps Memorial Society with assistance from the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei is holding the annual Remembrance Day service on Sunday November 15th. This year we will have one former Taiwan POW returning for this special 70th Anniversary of the end of WWII event.

The Remembrance Day service takes place at 11:00 am on the site of the former Kinkaseki POW Camp in the village of Jinguashi. Following the service, everyone is invited to join together for a picnic lunch in the community center.POW Rememberence

Chartered buses will depart from the east side of the Grand Hyatt Hotel – #2 SongShou Road – sharp at 9:15am, and will leave Jinguashi for Taipei around 2 pm. The cost for the bus and lunch is NT$400 and reservations are required.

Reservations for the Remembrance Day event can be made by contacting Tina Wu at the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei – Tel: 02-8723-3031 or email to: tina.wu@international.gc.ca.

Please book early to ensure you have a place on the bus. The deadline for the bus reservations is 5pm Wednesday, November 11th.

It is highly recommended that the bus transportation provided be used, as there is no parking for private vehicles at the site, special vehicle permits are required for access to the park on weekends, and we cannot be responsible for anyone getting lost on the way or being late for the service, if going by private vehicle.

We would appreciate it however if those who wish to go on their own would kindly also contact Tina to let her know, so that enough seating, programs and food can be prepared.

Everyone is welcome to join us for this year’s special events and we hope that many will come out to remember and honour the men to whom we owe a debt that can never be repaid.

For more information about the Remembrance Weekend events, please visit the Society website at: www.powtaiwan.org

Reservations are to be made with Tina only.
+886 2 8723 3031
tina.wu@international.gc.ca

Setting Up An Import/Export Business in Taiwan

The CCCT’s Small Business Network organized an event at Whalen’s called Setting Up An Import/Export Business in Taiwan.

We had three guest speakers come in and talk about working in the import/export business in Taiwan.Whalens Poutinerie

Our first speaker was Mr. Tom Cumming, Deputy Director of the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei. Tom talking about how the Canadian government can assist you with your import/export questions.

Next, Mrs. Courtney Cruzan, Marketing Manager for Hermin Textiles Co., Ltd. spoke about her role in international client and product development for the apparel and fashion industry. She spoke on the following topics:

  • Textile Industry International Marketing & Client Development
  • Building quality perception of Taiwanese textiles so we can demand a higher value price
  • Convincing brands we are design driven with the newest applied available technologies
  • Adapting and changing quickly for market conditions/ demands/ product expectations

Our next speaker was Mr. T. Runcie, Managing Director, Synergy Whisky Consortium Inc. Mr. Runcie spoke about importing Canadian fruit into Taiwan.

Finally, Mr. Josh Hon, CEO of Tern Bicycles, treated us to a great presentation about the basics in exporting in Taiwan. Josh talked about how his business exports folding bicycles.

CCCT Import:Export

CCCT Import:Export Talk

 

 

 

 

Volcanically Perfect Hot Springs in Taiwan

October is the beginning of hot spring season in Taiwan. This tiny island in the Pacific is known for its humid, damp and cold winters, and with the advance of cold weather, Taiwan’s hot spring areas begin to flourish once more.

With over 100 springs to choose from in locations all over the island, Taiwan is the perfect place to seek some hot spring action that will heat up both the body and soul. Taiwan is also home to hot springs of many different kinds. The island boasts sodium springs, sulfur springs, mud springs, cold springs, salt springs, and more. Each type of hot spring offers its own health benefits.

Beitou, Yangmingshan and Guanziling are the most appreciated and preferred hot spring areas in Taiwan.

Taiwan’s hot springs have a long history that got their start during the Japanese colonial period. From 1895 to 1945, hot spring areas around the island slowly began to flourish. In 1896, a Japanese man by the name of Hirado Gengo opened the first hot spring hotel in Beitou, New Taipei.

After that, Taiwan’s reputation as a hot spring destination skyrocketed as new hot spa resorts offering high class service, luxurious surroundings and world class facilities were quickly established in hot spring areas all over the country.

Taipei is one of the only cities in the world that can claim to have its very own hot spring mountain in its backyard. Taipei’s super efficient and ultra convenient transportation system can deliver you right to the doors of these gorgeous mountain hot spring hotels. Visitors have a number of choices to choose from. Public hot springs are available if you’re looking for an inexpensive afternoon of soaking or you can choose to relax in a traditional hot spring spa hotel that rents out rooms by the hour and by the night.

Beitou Hot Spring Valley is supplied by Yang Ming Mountain and it is famous for hot spring spas, beer halls, tea gardens and hostels. It is THE hunting ground for good old luxurious hot spring resorts.

In this area, there are three kinds of hot springs: green sulphur, white sulphur and ferrous sulphur. They all have their own healing magic.

Green sulfur water is the color of jade and the locals believe these waters heal rheumatism and ease exhaustion. White sulfur water looks milky and smells very strongly of sulphur. Soaking in white sulfur water is believed to treat ulcers, chronic skin diseases, liver diseases and diabetes. Ferrous sulfur water has a clear appearance and it is believed to relieve nerve strain and inflammation. Many people believe Yang Ming Mountains volcanic waters heal illnesses, but I would like to highlight the relaxing effect of these waters. It relaxes the mind and refreshes the strained body and soul.

Taking a long soak in one of Taiwan’s many hot springs, is an outstanding investment for yourself.

“There must be quite a few things that a hot bath won’t cure, but I don’t know many of them.” – Sylvia Plath

Reference List

Here are three choices that come highly recommended by travel bloggers and Trip Advisor reviewers.

Villa 32 in Beitou is known for being the perfect place for rest and rejuvenation. It is located between two majestic mountains that gives the perfect view. They offer three European style villas and two Japanese style villas. The resort does not allow guests under 16 years of age.

Landis Resort in Yangmingshan has reasonable prices and it offers facilities of an international standard. It has 47 guest rooms. Each room has a natural volcanic hot water hot tub. The hotel also has a spacious outdoor pool and a small restaurant that serves local and western food.

Toong Mao Spa Resort in Guanziling is well known for its mud springs. It has 76 suites and private oil hydrotherapy rooms, plus spa rooms and outdoor nude spa rooms for men and women. In the lobby it has a free exhibit that shows the development and history of spas in the region.

Bilguun NamsraiABOUT THE AUTHOR: Bilguun Namsrai is a Mongolian student who has been studying in Taipei, Taiwan since 2012. She completed her final year of undergraduate studies in capital city of Mongolia where she studied International Law. Currently, she is a senior graduate journalism student at Chinese Culture University.

While studying, Bilguun has always had an interest in law and journalism field. Upon graduation, Bilguun is looking to start her career as a news reporter, anchor in broadcasting channels, or as a contract lawyer. She is a member of the Foreign Students Club in Taiwan.

Common Mistakes Made by New Business Owners in Taiwan

Jumping In With Both Feet – Common Mistakes Made by New Business Owners in Taiwan

Last month, the CCCT Small Business Committee launched its second event, which was aimed at sharing common mistakes that are made by new business owners in Taiwan.

The CCCT’s Small Business Committee’s objective is to host events that are of interest to members while supporting our small business members. Thus, some of our event locations might not be held in a traditional setting, but we are achieving our goal of supporting local businesses in Taiwan. You do not need to be a member or be Canadian to join our events, but if you would like to host an event, you must be a CCCT member.

We had five guest speakers speak to a packed house on October 9th at DV8 in Taipei.

We opened with a great discussion on a few questions that plague new business owners. Is this something I can make money on? Will it work?

No one can just look at an idea and know if it will fly, but we have gathered a group of experienced business owners here in Taiwan that can certainly be able to offer some help and advice.

Market Research – Know the lay of the land in terms of where you want to launch your business. Ask yourself – Is it being done by someone else? If it’s not, there’s probably a good reason for it. Find successful and profitable business models and then add your unique spin on things. A million-dollar idea is typically based on what others have done, just make sure you do it uniquely so you can go farther. Become so familiar with your market research that you know the pros and cons in your field.

Who is the best? What are the mistakes people are making? What are customers asking for? Knowing the answers to these basic questions means avoiding less mistakes down the road.

Find out what the need is and if it’s within your ability to do so. Make sure you provide an excellent customer experience, offer amazing customer service, and make sure you show that you care about your customers.

John Kellenberger, Owner of Reach To Teach Recruiting – Topic: Financial ConsiderationsTeach in Taiwan with Reach To Teach

John has set up two businesses through JusRegal. He has also advised a number of individuals who are interested in starting a small business here. Here are some of the points he touched upon during his presentation:

  • Not having enough cash reserves
  • Sustaining your business through an unexpected difficulty (Example: Dealing with the Georgian Ministry of Education
  • Doing careful projections for your business (preparing for it not to go right – profit projections)
  • Shorting yourself on compensation
  • New owners tend to put everything back into the business and short themselves if the business hits a hard patch. If you plan properly like we mentioned before this hopefully won’t be necessary. Shorting your own income can lead to a whole host of issues.
  • Not realizing all of the cost of setting up a business
  • Registration costs – $30 to $40k,
  • Capital – APRC 100k, ARC 500k (ARC also has revenue standards for 1 year)
  • Office Rent – virtual, service, separate
  • Employee costs (health, pension, labor, employment insurance)
  • Insurance for business goods
  • We recommend using Vincent Kao at JusRegal CPA Firm. JusRegal JusRegal 200is Taiwan’s Exclusively Licensed Immigration CPA Firm.

John Groot, Founder of Clear Sky Communications – Topic: Mistakes Made Because of Cultural DifferencesClear Sky Communications logo

John talked about losing an important business friend. Having friends in business is important everywhere, but in few countries is this truer than Taiwan. But when a business contact, especially a VIP, says that they are your friend, what does that mean? I had and lost such a friend in Taiwan, a C level IT executive for a large enterprise that helped me set up training contracts among his contacts.

He could have helped me a lot more, had I not made a fatal mistake. Not a blunder, it was a culturally based misunderstanding. But it made me realize that it is not just important to know who your friends are, but what that friendship means to them. Hopefully this example can help entrepreneurs avoid similar mistakes, and have better relationships with their key business partners and patrons.

Josh Yang, General Manager, Able-Intl Products – Topic: Mistakes made with import and retail businesses in Taiwan

  • Employ a scientific process for selecting potential products (i.e. the look, features, price) This will enhance the likelihood of introducing a successful product to market.
  • Keep reasonably small inventory when products are still new on the market. I can’t stress enough the importance of having cash reserve.
  • Ask around for the market price before joining a trade show. If you don’t know what the average prices people are paying for a booth, you might end up paying more than others.
  • Have a good mix of chain store and independent store customers. Independent stores give you the cash you need, but chain stores might give you the sales volume, but longer terms of payment and takes you more resources.
  • Differences between importing Canadian vs American goods. You have more US suppliers / products, better prices, more boats coming from the US, better freight rates etc., but, more consumers here have better perception about Canadian products.

Joe O’Brien, Managing Director White Fox Global Co. Ltd – Topic: Timing and scheduling of imported items

Joe will talk about timing and how to figure out when things need to be processed for importing and exporting.

Andrew Lunman, Restauranteur, Owner of Coda, Bongers, Forkers, and Eat Smart – Topic: Setting Up Your Restaurant Legally

Andrew touched briefly upon the topic of setting up a restaurant correctly and which license to apply for, as well as stressing why you should set your business up in your name.

NOTE FROM THE CCCT SMALL BUSINESS COMMITTEE

We are always looking for guest speakers, so please get in touch with us at info@cancham.tw. If you’d like to get involved in future small business events through the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan.

Would you like to be a speaker at one of our events?

 

 

Mid-Autumn Festival in Taiwan

Right now, people all over the island of Taiwan are gearing up for a long weekend because of the Mid-Autumn Festival, which is also known as the Moon Cake Festival. It is an extremely important holiday in Taiwan and in other parts of Asia. It began around 3,000 years ago in Mainland China and it takes place during the autumn season of the Chinese lunar calendar. Depending on the lunar calendar, the date changes to different days every year.

This year, the Moon Festival will be held on Sunday, September 27th, but people throughout Taiwan will enjoy a long weekend that runs from Saturday, September 26th to Monday, September 28th.

In 2016, the Mid-Autumn Festival will take place on September 15th.

During these days, the moon becomes big and bright and it shines on us with its utmost brilliance. Traditionally, this is a time for moon watching, worshiping ancestors, and spending time with loved ones.

Friends and families offer moon cakes to each other while praying and celebrating this day. This time of year is always considered to be the best time for barbecues, and you will see many families out on the streets barbecuing and looking at the moon.

Moon cakes are a very special part of Moon Festival celebrations. These cakes are made with egg yolks, and you can sometimes see the resemblance to the moon in the center of each moon cake. There are all sorts of moon cakes, from fried to steamed, and of every flavor imaginable! Red bean, lotus seed, green tea and cream cheese are just a few of the flavors that these delicious cakes are available in.

Right now, shops all over Taiwan are offering moon cakes. Even Haagen Daz offers mooncakes, although you would need to get them home fast since they are made out of ice cream!

Taipei Moon Festival

The Moon Cake Festival comes from an ancient story about the mythical Moon Goddess of Immorality. There are many stories, but most of them concerning the Mid-Autumn Festival are centered around a mythological archer named Houyi, who fell in love with a beautiful woman named Chang’e.

Legend has it that there was once a time when there were ten suns were in the sky. This phenomenon caused the Earth to burn, so the Chinese emperor ordered Houyi to shoot down nine of the ten suns.

He completed the mission flawlessly and was rewarded with the elixir of eternal life which, when drank, would immediately send him to the skies where he could reign as a god forever.

Through a sad twist of fate, Chang’e ended up consuming the elixir and it immediately drew her up into the skies where she became Goddess of the Moon.

Brave Houyi, of course, had no way to reach his wife and instead was resigned to watching her appear once a year on the surface of the moon. He began offering his prayers and sacrifices of food at his local temple in the hopes that she would rejoin him on Earth, and soon after, the local people began doing the same.

Another version of the Moon Cake Festival comes from the uprising of the Chinese against the Mongol rulers during the 14th century. Zhu Yuan Zhang, the Chinese rebel leader, was planning a rebellion. Zhu Yuan Zhang and his warriors knew that the Mongols didn’t eat moon cakes, and they concocted a scheme to send messages to one another that were hidden in the center of the mooncakes.

Inside each moon cake was a piece of paper with the message, “Uprise on the 15th day of the autumn season”. On that day, with the precise coordination in hand, the Chinese succeeded in overthrowing their oppressors.

Under Zhu Yuan Zhang, the Ming Dynasty (1368 to 1644) was established. After that, the Moon Cake Festival was forevermore celebrated to commemorate this historical event. This is also why some people call the moon cake the symbol of Chinese reunion”.

Whatever your beliefs about how the Mid-Autumn Festival came about, one thing is certain – people around the world will be gazing at the moon and cherishing this special time of the year with their loved ones.

Moon Festival Taipei

About the Author

Bilguun NamsraiBilguun Namsrai is a Mongolian student who has been studying in Taipei, Taiwan since 2012. She completed her final year of undergraduate in capital city of Mongolia where she studied International Law.

Currently, she is a senior graduate journalism student at Chinese Culture University.

While studying, Bilguun has always had an interest in law and journalism field. Upon graduation, Bilguun is looking to start her career as a news reporter, anchor in broadcasting channels, or as a contract lawyer. She is a member of the Foreign Students Club in Taiwan.

REFERENCE LIST:

Wikipedia.org
www.yoursingapore.com
www.traditions.cultural-china.com
www.chinatownology.com

Celebrating Ghost Month in Taiwan

Throughout the month of August, residents of Taiwan are burning paper money and worshipping at their local temples and on the streets to feed the hungry ghosts of Taiwan.

This festival is called Zhong Yuan Jie (中元节), which is also known as the Hungry Ghost Festival. It traditionally falls on the 15th day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar. The festival is celebrated for a month, and it is usually held during the month of August.
The Ghost Festival: lion dance

During this celebration, Taiwanese people believe that the gates of hell are open and hungry ghosts go out from netherworld to look for food.

The original customs of this festival came from Mainland China, but it also celebrated by other Buddhist Asian countries. The customs and beliefs that are celebrated in Taiwan, however, differ from other countries slightly. For one, it is very common for people to burn joss papers, which is a type of currency for the dead. They believe that by offering joss paper, the dead will be able to purchase whatever they need in the afterlife, thus ensuring that they do not come back to the land of the living for their valuables.

During August, but also on other special dates throughout the year, it’s very common to see families and places of business and worship offering fresh fruits vegetables, snacks and drinks on tables in front of their homes and businesses. Elaborate meals are prepared with empty seats at the table for each deceased relative within family. These foods are meant to appease the ghosts and it is believed that food will sustain them during their long journey back to the underworld.

Along with food offerings, traditional concerts and shows are often held for the ghosts’ viewing pleasure. Traditionally, during these concerts, the first row of chairs is always left empty for the spirits. It is believed that if you sit in one of these seats, you are inviting a spirit to come and possess you. So please be aware of where you are sitting during these ceremonies!

On the 14th day, in Taiwan, candles and lotus flowers are placed in lanterns that float on water. The Taiwanese believe that ghosts can find way back to hell through these floating lanterns.

Taiwanese cities such as Keelung in the north, Toucheng on the East Coast, and Hengchun in the southern part of Taiwan, are all well known throughout Taiwan for their elaborate Ghost Festival celebrations.

The customs and rituals that are celebrated during Ghost Month are meant to keep the ghosts happy, but that is not the only reason why this festival is celebrated in Taiwan. Celebrating Ghost Month in Taiwan and ensuring that the ghosts of Taiwan are treated with respect ensures that you and your family will have great luck in the year to come.

About the Author

Bilguun NamsraiBilguun Namsrai is a Mongolian student who has been studying in Taipei, Taiwan since 2012. She completed her final year of undergraduate in capital city of Mongolia where she studied International Law. Currently, she is a senior graduate journalism student at Chinese Culture University.

While studying, Bilguun has always had an interest in law and journalism field. Upon graduation, Bilguun is looking to start her career as a news reporter, anchor in broadcasting channels, or as a contract lawyer. She is a member of the Foreign Students Club in Taiwan.

Resource list

www.oncekids.blogspot.com
www.taiwanese-secrets.com
http://city543.com/

A Letter of Thanks to Our 2015 Celebration Canada Sponsors

Dear All,

On behalf of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, I would like to express our sincere thanks for your support of this year’s 2015 Celebration Canada.

As the event continues to grow and become even more successful, I would like to emphasize how much your sponsorship support means to us. This year we had over 9,000 attendees, and we are proud that this event remains the largest Canada Day celebration outside of North America. Without your support this event and the Chamber itself, could not continue to operate.

We also hope that you pleased with the exposure you gained from participating in this year’s Celebration Canada and that you will consider sponsoring again next year! If you have any suggestions on what we can do better next year, please do not hesitate to let us know!

Thank you again and we look forward to seeing you at our other Canadian Chamber of Commerce events!

Best Regards,

Leo Seewald
Acting Chairman, Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan